Online Privacy: How to Minimize Your Digital Footprint

Minimize digital footprint_header

Online privacy is a topic getting a lot of attention these days and has become a large concern among consumers. While the obvious solution is to take steps to better protect your online privacy, a survey published in Consumer Reports found that 62% of U.S. consumers “have done nothing to protect their privacy on the Internet.” This doesn’t mean consumers don’t care about privacy. In fact, the same survey notes that 58% of online users are concerned that the National Security Agency (NSA) may be spying on them.

If you are one of the 58% who is unsure where to begin to protect your privacy, there are steps you can take to help minimize your digital footprint and keep your data more private when you’re on the Web:

Check your browser’s privacy settings.
Today’s web browsers usually allow you to be tracked by default. But they also offer tools for strengthening your privacy while you surf, such as the ability to block cookies. (A ‘cookie’ is a small file placed on your computer by a website you visit. Cookies can track your activity while you’re on that site.)

Your first action should be to explore your browser’s default privacy settings and make changes to these settings accordingly. Be aware that blocking all cookies can make your Web surfing less convenient, as they help websites remember you when you return, amongst other benefits.

Use available tools to manage your online privacy
Privacy settings vary between browsers and can be limited in their reach. Google Chrome’s Incognito mode, for instance, prevents others who use your browser from seeing where you’ve been online, but it doesn’t prevent you from being tracked by online companies and advertisers.

Fortunately, there are online tools* available that can help you control and protect your privacy.

Anti-tracking tools
Anytime you visit a website, you’re being tracked. Anti-tracking software discloses all the companies that are tracking you and gives you the ability to prevent them from collecting, analyzing, and even selling your personal data without your permission.

Disconnect
Ghostery
Lightbeam
DoNotTrackMe**
Privacy Badger

Private Search Engines
Whenever you perform a search on Google, Yahoo!, or Bing, your IP address, search terms, and other personal data are being tracked. With private search engines, you can search for what you need and still remain anonymous. Some of the listed private search engines have some limitations, so make sure to evaluate them yourself to see which one might suit you best.

DuckDuckGo
StartPage
Ixquick
Privatelee

Website Encryption tools
Earlier in the year, we wrote a blog on “HTTPS: The S is More Than Just a Letter” – noting how HTTPS provides secure communication over a network, whereas HTTP does not. By employing one of the encryption tools listed below, websites that normally route to HTTP are rerouted to HTTPS – should the website support HTTPS to begin with.

HTTPS Everywhere
Force-TLS
KB SSL Enforcer

Private (Anonymous) Browsers
The likelihood that you’re using Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, and/or Google Chrome is pretty high. The downside of these major browsers is that your personal data is being tracked. Private browsers, on the other hand, are specifically developed to protect user privacy. Please keep in mind that using an alternative browser isn’t necessarily risk-free. For example, there have been reports that many cyber criminals use the anonymous Tor network to store their malware.

Tor
Whitehat Aviator

Virtual Private Networks (VPN)
A VPN lets you send and receive data on public networks with the privacy benefits of a secure network. Although VPN software is most often used to give corporate employees secure access to corporate information, consumers can use VPN software to more privately visit websites without exposing their own IP address or other identifying information. Some consumer VPN clients offer free and paid access, depending on features and usage.

SurfEasy VPN
StrongVPN
Hotspot Shield

The Time to Start Protecting Your Privacy is Now
Online privacy is clearly a growing concern for many. But, as the Consumer Reports survey highlights, consumers’ fears of being tracked online are out of sync with their efforts to prevent it.

The fact is, taking action is always more effective than choosing to do nothing. Protecting your online privacy doesn’t require a lot of effort or money. And importantly, the time to start is now.
 
 
*= The tools listed here are not endorsed or recommended by Check Point Software Technologies or ZoneAlarm. Please perform your own research and use at your own discretion.

**= You can get DoNotTrackMe PLUS Facebook Privacy Scan and Private Browsing in our ZoneAlarm Privacy Toolbar, which is included in ZoneAlarm Pro Firewall, ZoneAlarm Pro Antivirus + Firewall, ZoneAlarm Internet Security Suite, ZoneAlarm Extreme Security, ZoneAlarm Free Firewall, and ZoneAlarm Free Antivirus + Firewall.

4 thoughts on “Online Privacy: How to Minimize Your Digital Footprint

  1. It is some how amusing to note that people are concerned about being spyed on by the NSA. If the NSA was indeed interested, they’d open a Facebook or Twitter account like everyone else, why would they need to ‘spy’ on anyone? Very few people are that interesting to begin with and flaunt their private information on the web anyways, presumably to make themselves more interesting. I’d be more concerned with businesses ‘spying’ on me in an effort to tailor their spam after my ‘likes’ and ‘dislikes’.

    • Its not a question of “if” its happening. It IS happening. They are collecting all data online permanently. They dont need to make a facebook account ehen they have full access to ALL the ingormation. Get with the times.

  2. I cannot praise Abine’s DoNotTrackMe highly enough. It is one of the best privacy tools for Windows users with all of the browsers.

    If you use Firefox, the Cookie-Safe add-on tames many of the unruly cookies and I provide a cookie block list for users that will be updated again soon.

    Although IxQuick is nice you can use it only a limited time. Do not delete the cookie for DuckDuckGo if you tailor it like I do. I make it give results it usually omits because I am hunting for the malware and other bad things to block them in my blocking hosts file and PAC filter. When it comes to DuckDuckGo, less is more. You may get less results but you usually find what you were looking for more quickly than Google. It is my standard search engine.

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